Your Questions About Healthy Eating For Menopausal Women


April 3, 2013 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Weight Loss Tips


Lisa asks…

How should a woman prevent middle age weight gain?

if you’ve always done 30 minutes of aerobic exercise, lifted free weights and eaten low-fat food/many vegetables, what else can you do if you are concerned and have close relatives that gained 60+ lbs. My mom said she exercised an hour a day, and always ate healthy foods (no fast food, etc.), yet still developed metabolic syndrome. Is it hopeless, or can women prevent pre and post menopausal weight gain?

Power Health Tips answers:

In addition to the eating lots of fruits and veggies and the exercise drinking a lot of water and also watching portion sizes can help with weight loss.

Also, weight gain such as in middle age can be as a result of hormone imbalances like with the thyroid. If there is a problem with the thyroid medication can be prescribed to help it. One of the symptoms of an underactive thyroid also called hypothyroidism is weight gain.

As to how to prevent it trying to eat right, exercise, and get checked for potential problems that can help with some of the prevention.

John asks…

Are there certain things i can eat to get healthier nails?

My nails are very weak and always breaking & chipping. Is there a certain vitamin i need more of or should i eat certain foods or what?

Power Health Tips answers:

Moisturize your nails and cuticles several times a day and after your nails have been in water. Also, apply moisturizer at bedtime and cover your hands with cotton gloves.

Apply a nail hardener, but avoid products containing toluene sulfonamide or formaldehyde. These chemicals can cause redness or irritate the skin.

Don’t use nail polish remover more than once a week. When you do need a remover, avoid those that use acetone, which dries nails.

Take a biotin supplement. Taking 2.5 milligrams of biotin daily may increase the thickness of nails.

Taking calcium will also work when nails are brittle and cuticles ragged. In fact, calcium is recommended for pregnant women, menopausal women and anyone who is on a weight reduction diet. Doctors suggest 1200 mg. Once a day. Not only does this help with fingernails, bones also benefit from this added dosage of calcium.

Protein is very important to build calcium in the nails. Protein is found in fish, chicken, and red meat, and, in order to get the recommended daily requirement of protein, nutritionists recommend 8 ounces of one of these per day. For people following a vegetarian diet, protein and calcium supplements are a necessity.

Thomas asks…

What type of fruits are the healthiest?

I like bananas, melons, watermelons, grapes, and oranges. What are other fruits that are very healthy?

Power Health Tips answers:

The so called “superfoods” are best for you – stuffed with anti-oxidants and vitamins you cant go wrong with them 🙂 not all fruit but they are the best foods for you 🙂

1. Apples
Over 7,500 varieties of apple are grown throughout the world. They are packed full of antioxidants, especially vitamin C for healthy skin and gums – one apple provides a quarter of your daily requirement of vitamin C.
Apples also contain a form of soluble fibre called pectin that can help to lower blood cholesterol levels and keep the digestive system healthy.
An apple is also a carbohydrate with a low glycaemic index (GI) type.
Low GI foods are digested slowly; once they are finally broken down in the intestine they are gradually absorbed into the bloodstreams as glucose, causing a gradual rise in blood sugar levels.
They may help with weight control, as well as improving diabetics’ long-term control of blood sugar levels.

3. Broccoli
Just two florets – raw or lightly cooked – count as a veggie portion.
Not only does broccoli contain antioxidants including vitamin C but it’s a particularly good source of folate (naturally occuring folic acid).
Increasing your intake of folic acid is thought to be of major benefit in preventing heart disease.
Broccoli also contains an antioxidant called lutein that can delay the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This affects 10 per cent of people over 60 and is a major cause of impaired vision and blindness.
Finally, broccoli also contains a phytochemical called sulphoraphane that has specific anti-cancer properties.
4. Olive oil
Several large studies suggest that the monosaturated fat in olive oil is good for the heart. Olive oil lower bad cholesterol levels and increases the good levels.
Olive oil is also rich in antioxidants – it’s probably one of the key protective aspects of the so-called Mediterranean diet.
Watch out for the calories – a little goes a long way. A tablespoon of oil contains 120 kilocalories, which is the same as a large slice of bread and butter.

5. Wholegrain Seeded Bread
Breads containing a lot of seeds and wholegrain have a low GI, which can protect against heart disease, reduce hunger pangs, and help with weight control.
They are also packed with fibre, which keeps the gut working efficiently; and seeded breads contain essential fatty acids.
Studies show that including four flices of soya and linseed bread a day can give a does of phytoestrogens, through to relieve “hot flushes” in menopausal women.
The downside is that bread contains a lot of salt. However, the good news is that bread manufacturers have started to use less salt in their pre-packaged bread.
6. Salmon
All fish is a source of good-quality protein, vitamins, and minerals, but oily fish such as salmon also contains omega 3 fats that reduce blood clotting and inflammation.
Studies show that eating oily fish dramatically recues the risk of having a heart attack, even in older adults.
Omega 3 fats also help to prevent depression, and protect against the onset of dementia. Yep, it’s true, fish really is an all-round brain food.

7. Tea
The drink loved by all Britons has a range of useful properties. The caffeine content is helpful for stimulating alertness, mood and motivation.
Tea counts towards the recommended eight cups of fluid daily, which is the minimum to avoid dehydration.
Tea, whether black or green, is a rich source of the antioxidant called catechins. Studies suggest that catechins protect the artery walls against the damage that causes heart disease and prevents formation of sticky blood clots.
Some population studies suggest as little as one cuppa a day seems to offer some protection.
8. Yogurt
Yogurt is an easily absorbed source of calcium. It’s also a useful milk subsitute for people who can’t digest large amounts of the milk sugar, lactose.
Yogurt has long been credited with a range of therapeutic benefits, many of which involve the health of the large intestine and the relief of gastrointestinal upsets.
The bacteria Lactobacillus GG, added to some yoghurt, are not digested, and reach the large intestine intact where they top up the other friendly bacteria living there.
The friendly bacteria fight harmful bacteria, including Clostridium difficile that can cause diarrhoea after a course of antibiotics.

10. Brazil nuts
All nuts are generally full of essential vitamins, minerals and fibre. Recent studies suggest that eating a small handful of nuts four times a week can help reduce heart disease and satisfy food cravings.
Brazil nuts are one of the few good sources of selenium that may help protect against cancer, depression and Alzheimer’s disease.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-369042/The-10-super-foods.html#ixzz1j5vXzjv7

Ken asks…

What are some health benefits of apples?

I’ve started having an apple (or more) a day, in part to keep the doctor away, but also because I finally found a place nearby that sells good apples fairly consistently. I was wondering what some of the health benefits are – I’ve heard that apples can help you run better, for one thing, and was wondering if that was true. Also I’ve been told they’re pretty high in fiber. What else are they good for? And which color of apples (red vs green) is better for you, from a health standpoint, or does it really matter?

Power Health Tips answers:

We’re told that an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but what exactly are the health benefits of apples? Here are ten reasons to heed the advice of that old proverb.

Bone Protection
French researchers found that a flavanoid called phloridzin that is found only in apples may protect post-menopausal women from osteoporosis and may also increase bone density. Boron, another ingredient in apples, also strengthens bones.

Asthma Help
One recent study shows that children with asthma who drank apple juice on a daily basis suffered from less wheezing than children who drank apple juice only once per month. Another study showed that children born to women who eat a lot of apples during pregnancy have lower rates of asthma than children whose mothers ate few apples.

Alzheimer’s Prevention
A study on mice at Cornell University found that the quercetin in apples may protect brain cells from the kind of free radical damage that may lead to Alzheimer’s disease.

Lower Cholesterol
The pectin in apples lowers LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. People who eat two apples per day may lower their cholesterol by as much as 16 percent.

Lung Cancer Prevention
According to a study of 10,000 people, those who ate the most apples had a 50 percent lower risk of developing lung cancer. Researchers believe this is due to the high levels of the flavonoids quercetin and naringin in apples.

Breast Cancer Prevention
A Cornell University study found that rats who ate one apple per day reduced their risk of breast cancer by 17 percent. Rats fed three apples per day reduced their risk by 39 percent and those fed six apples per day reduced their risk by 44 percent.

Colon Cancer Prevention
One study found that rats fed an extract from apple skins had a 43 percent lower risk of colon cancer. Other research shows that the pectin in apples reduces the risk of colon cancer and helps maintain a healthy digestive tract.

Liver Cancer Prevention
Research found that rats fed an extract from apple skins had a 57 percent lower risk of liver cancer.

Diabetes Management
The pectin in apples supplies galacturonic acid to the body which lowers the body’s need for insulin and may help in the management of diabetes.

Weight Loss
A Brazilian study found that women who ate three apples or pears per day lost more weight while dieting than women who did not eat fruit while dieting.

David asks…

What’s the difference between EFA and Omega 3 nutritional supplements?

I would like to know what the functions of each one of these are, and if they contain similar nutritional value.

Power Health Tips answers:

Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) are necessary fats that humans cannot synthesize, and must be obtained through diet. EFAs are long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from linolenic, linoleic, and oleic acids. There are two families of EFAs: Omega-3 and Omega-6. Omega-9 is necessary yet “non-essential” because the body can manufacture a modest amount on its own, provided essential EFAs are present. The number following “Omega-” represents the position of the first double bond, counting from the terminal methyl group on the molecule. Omega-3 fatty acids are derived from Linolenic Acid, Omega-6 from Linoleic Acid, and Omega-9 from Oleic Acid.
EFAs support the cardiovascular, reproductive, immune, and nervous systems. The human body needs EFAs to manufacture and repair cell membranes, enabling the cells to obtain optimum nutrition and expel harmful waste products. A primary function of EFAs is the production of prostaglandins, which regulate body functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, blood clotting, fertility, conception, and play a role in immune function by regulating inflammation and encouraging the body to fight infection. Essential Fatty Acids are also needed for proper growth in children, particularly for neural development and maturation of sensory systems, with male children having higher needs than females. Fetuses and breast-fed infants also require an adequate supply of EFAs through the mother’s dietary intake.
EFA deficiency is common in the United States, particularly Omega-3 deficiency. An ideal intake ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3 fatty acids is between 1:1 and 4:1, with most Americans only obtaining a ratio between 10:1 and 25:1. The minimum healthy intake for both linolenic (Omega-3) and linoleic (Omega-6) acid via diet, per adult per day, is 1.5 grams of each. One tablespoon of flaxseed oil can provide this amount, or larger amounts of other linolenic-rich foods. Because high heat destroys linolenic acid, cooking in linolenic-rich oils or eating cooked linolenic-rich fish is unlikely to provide a sufficient amount.
EFA deficiency and Omega 6/3 imbalance is linked with serious health conditions, such as heart attacks, cancer, insulin resistance, asthma, lupus, schizophrenia, depression, postpartum depression, accelerated aging, stroke, obesity, diabetes, arthritis, ADHD, and Alzheimer’s Disease, among others.

Omega-3 (Linolenic Acid)

Alpha Linolenic Acid (ALA) is the principal Omega-3 fatty acid, which a healthy human will convert into eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and later into docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). EPA and the GLA synthesized from linoleic (Omega-6) acid are later converted into hormone-like compounds known as eicosanoids, which aid in many bodily functions including vital organ function and intracellular activity.
Omega-3s are used in the formation of cell walls, making them supple and flexible, and improving circulation and oxygen uptake with proper red blood cell flexibility and function.
Omega-3 deficiencies are linked to decreased memory and mental abilities, tingling sensation of the nerves, poor vision, increased tendency to form blood clots, diminished immune function, increased triglycerides and “bad” cholesterol (LDL) levels, impaired membrane function, hypertension, irregular heart beat, learning disorders, menopausal discomfort, itchiness on the front of the lower leg(s), and growth retardation in infants, children, and pregnant women.
Omega-6 (Linoleic Acid)

Linoleic Acid is the primary Omega-6 fatty acid. A healthy human with good nutrition will convert linoleic acid into gamma linolenic acid (GLA), which will later by synthesized, with EPA from the Omega-3 group, into eicosanoids.
Some Omega-6s improve diabetic neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis, PMS, skin disorders (e.g. Psoriasis and eczema), and aid in cancer treatment.
Although most Americans obtain an excess of linoleic acid, often it is not converted to GLA because of metabolic problems caused by diets rich in sugar, alcohol, or trans fats from processed foods, as well as smoking, pollution, stress, aging, viral infections, and other illnesses such as diabetes. It is best to eliminate these factors when possible, but some prefer to supplement with GLA-rich foods such as borage oil, black currant seed oil, or evening primrose oil.

Found in foods:

Flaxseed oil, flaxseeds, flaxseed meal, hempseed oil, hempseeds, grapeseed oil, pumpkin seeds, pine nuts, pistachio nuts, sunflower seeds (raw), olive oil, olives, borage oil, evening primrose oil, black currant seed oil, chestnut oil, chicken, among many others.
Avoid refined and hydrogenated versions of these foods.
Corn, safflower, sunflower, soybean, and cottonseed oils are also sources of linoleic acid, but are refined and may be nutrient-deficient as sold in stores.

Omega-9 (Oleic Acid)

Essential but technically not an EFA, because the human body can manufacture a limited amount, provided essential EFAs are present.
Mon

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Comments